Wikipedia Refuses to Remove Monkey Selfie

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Wikipedia Refuses to Remove Monkey Selfie


[MUSIC] Trisha: Hey guys, welcome back to Sourcefed,
I’m Trisha Hershberger. Selfie laws are at it again! Sounds silly, I know, but here’s
the deal. (Quick) When a photo is taken the legal copyright of that photo belongs to the
photographer, aka, the person who snapped the photo, not the subject of the photo or
the owner of this camera. By this logic, in the instance of a selfie, it is the person
who actually pressed the button to take the picture who is given legal rights to the photo
as the photographer, again not the subject of the photo or the person who owns the camera
or phone. So if I grab Will’s phone and take a selfie of Will and I, I can legally
tell him to remove it because it’s mine. Odd, ya, but that explains why technically,
Bradley Cooper owns “Ellen’s” famous Oscar selfie.
Now that you have that background, I think you are ready for this. We are all ready for
this. This photo was taken by a monkey, a crested black
macaque to be specific. In fact, it was taken by the same macaque featured in the photo
making it a monkey selfie. You see, British nature photographer David Slater travelled
to Indonesia to photograph the black crested macaque in it’s native habitat and, after
setting up his camera, was startled to see a somewhat real life curious George approaching.
Slater backed off to observe, while the monkeys jumped all over his equiptment, found the
shutter and decided he liked the noise and proceeded to take hundreds of monkey selfies.
AWESOME Wikipedia also thought it was awesome and
decided to use the photos at which point David Slater, who isn’t a fan of Wikipedia using
his photos without his permission, asked for them to be removed.  His requests were denied
by Wikimedia on the grounds that he does not own the photo since he did not take the picture.
While selfie law does indeed point to the monkey as the owner, Slater did spend all
the money for the equiptment and travel and now 17 grand in legal fees.  That sucks.
Wikipedia, however, is not arguing that the monkey owns the photo, they’re statement
on the issue is as follows, “This file is in the public domain, because as the work
of a non-human animal, it has no human author in whom copyright is vested.”  So what
do you think? Is this photo public domain, or does it have a definite owner and if so,
is it Mr. Slater or the monkey?  Let us know your thoughts in the comments down below. Please Like, and you know, subscribe to this channel and maybe to NERD and maybe to FHP and all the other stuff we have going on, I’m Trisha Hershberger. I wish I could have a selfie with a monkey. But wait, that story the other day, it’s going to rip my face off. Nevermind! [MUSIC]

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