How To Fix ‘Could Not Reconnect All Network Drives’ Error

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How To Fix ‘Could Not Reconnect All Network Drives’ Error


Hi my name is Chris and this is Battle(non)sense If you ever used network drives in windows,
then you have probably encountered this issue here where windows reports that it could not
connect some or all of your network drives, but when you open the windows explorer and
click on such an offline network drive, then it works just fine and changes its state from
offline to online. Now this is not a new issue that was introduced
with Windows 10, Windows 8 or even Windows 7. When you search for this issue online then
you will find topics from users who even had this issue back in Windows XP, which is just mind boggling as you’d think that such an issue would be fairly important for Microsoft
to fix as soon as possible. So, if you use network drives then you know
how annoying this issue can be, especially when it only occurs occasionally, because you will probably only notice that some of your network drives are offline after you already opened a project file in like
Adobe Premiere where some assets are unavailable then, or when AutoCAD is unable to access your project folder because it is located on such an offline network drive or when your MediaCenter tells you it can’t access any
of the sources because of this issue. So, like many others I tried registry tweaks group policy changes that should get windows to wait for the network to be ready before
it connects the network drives I disabled fast boot I changed in which order windows services are started I tried a ton of scripts as well as using the windows sync feature
for offline files to ensure that the network drives get online and a lot more. But, while some of these measures did work
on a few PC’s, or worked for just a short time, I could not find a solution that would
fix the root cause of this problem on all PCs and just prevent this issue from happening
in the first place. So, in today’s video I want to show you
2 workarounds, which sadly won’t fix whatever causes this issue, but they at least ensure that all network drives are online when you start your PC, so that you don’t have to
manually click on them inside the windows explorer to make them available for your applications. Now, let’s say that you have already mapped
all network drives and you want a very simple solution where you don’t have to configure anything. A solution that must be as easy as launching
a script, like this one here. So how did my script just reconnect my network drives, even though I did not tell it anything
about my network drives. First it waits until the network is ready, because otherwise it can’t access the network shares. Once the network is ready, the script waits
5 seconds to avoid that the next command fails on slower PC’s. Then the script uses the ‘net use’ command
to get a list of all the offline network drives. In this case it found 6 offline drives, R, S, U, V, Y and Z. The X drive is not offline anymore because
I clicked on that drive earlier. Then it uses the windows explorer to access
each of these offline network drives, which is basically the same thing as if you would click on each of these drives inside the windows explorer. Then the script waits again for a few seconds
to give the system some time to access the network drives, before it then closes the explorer windows it opened. And that’s it! Now all network drives show up as online and can be accessed by any of your applications. So, if you suffer from the issue where network
drives show up as offline, but you can still access them just by clicking
on them inside the windows explorer, then you can use my script to have it do that
work for you. And unlike other scripts, mine does not require
any configuration at all, as it detects the offline network drives on its own. So, if you want to use that script then you can find a link to this website in the description of this video, where you can download the latest version. Once you downloaded the script,
you extract the zip file, rename the folder, and then store it somewhere save where you won’t accidentally delete it. Then create a shortcut, and change its properties
to launch the script minimized, so that the command prompt window does not
pop in the center on your monitor when you boot your PC. Now to launch this script automatically when
you start your PC, you just must move that shortcut to the start-up folder of either your own user account, or the one which is used for all users. So, to access the start-up folder for your
current user, you go to start, type run, enter shell:startup and then move or copy the shortcut into this
folder. So, when you launch your PC now then windows
will run that script, which waits for the network to get ready, before it then accesses and reconnects the offline network drives so that your applications can then use these drives and you don’t have to customize anything
inside the script as it does all of that on its own. The other script I want to tell you about, which you can also find a download link for in the description of this video, works a bit differently. It also checks if the network is ready before it does something, but you must enter the drive letter and path of every network share that you want to map inside of windows, where the persistent NO flag says that windows will
forget that network drive when you shut down or reboot your PC. If you need to provide a user and password
to access the share, then you can either include that information inside the script, which is not safe, or you can go to “Manage Windows Credentials” and add that information here. So what you could do is add all your network
drives inside that script, create a shortcut, change the properties to launch the script
minimized, and then move that shortcut to the start-up folder of either your user, or all users so that windows will only connect your network drives once the network is ready. So again, I know that my scripts are just
workarounds as they don’t fix whatever causes that network drives show up as offline,
even though they are online. But at least you no longer have to manually
open the windows explorer and click on every offline drive to get windows to know that these are actually online. And that’s all for today. I hope that you found this video interesting
and if you try one of my scripts then please leave a comment down below as I’m very interested to hear if they worked for you. If you like the content that I put out on
my channel then it would be great if you could support me on Patreon, because without the awesome support that I get from my patrons Battle(non)sense could simply not exists anymore. You can find a link to my Patreon in the description
down below, where you will also find links to my social accounts in case that you want to stay up to date on the videos that I am working on. So, if you enjoyed this video then please
give it a like, subscribe for more and I hope to see you next time! Until then, have a nice day and take care, My name is Chris and this was Battle(non)sense

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