How to cite using APA style (6th ed.): Websites

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How to cite using APA style (6th ed.): Websites

How to cite using APA style (6th ed.): Websites


This video will provide some guidelines on citing free Internet websites using APA style. Note that if you’re trying to cite a journal, newspaper, or magazine article that you retrieved online or from a library database, this is NOT the best example for that. In that case, you want to follow our other APA style video for citing articles. It’s important that you give credit to others for the work that they’ve done so that you can avoid plagiarism. Not doing so, intentionally or not, is misrepresenting your own work and may result in serious academic and legal ramifications. Websites are probably the hardest type of citation to create because a lot of the information can be hard to find, or missing. It’s important to keep in mind that if you can’t find much of this information, it’s hard to validate that you are in fact using a reliable source. If you are missing information, visit this page from the APA Style Blog to see how you need to rearrange the citation pieces you do have. First is the name of the author or authors, then the date the information on the page was published. Notice that because websites are frequently updated more often, include as much detail as the page gives you – if it tells you the year, month, and/or day, include all of that, formatted like this. Then include the title of the specific page you were actually on, and finally the link for the page. Let’s take a look at this example webpage. If we can find an individual’s name as an author, that’s preferred, but often we don’t have one, so APA tells us to use a “corporate author” – a group or an agency, in this case the American Marketing Association. The title of the page is usually near the top, but it’s not always the most prominent text – in this case, Student Resource Center seems to be a heading and each of these buttons leads to a different page, so “Collegiate chapter events” is the unique title for this page. If you’re not sure, look for things like the website’s navigation structure to figure out which title is unique. You can also look for what name is used in the title that you should see within your internet browser. If there is a date of publication, usually it is found at the top or bottom of the page. This page has a Copyright date at the bottom, but if we check a few other pages within the AMA site, we’ll see that the same 2017 copyright is currently used for every single one of its pages. So that’s not really a date of publication or most recent update for this specific page. Thus in this case, we’ll have to indicate “no date”. Now we can create our citation. For a corporate author like this one, you’ll want to capitalize every significant word of their name since it’s a proper noun, rather than using the abbreviation, in this case AMA. As we found that this website doesn’t have a publication or updated date, we’ll use a lowercase n.d. for “no date.” Finally, notice that website titles are also in sentence case capitalization, where you only capitalize the first word of the title and any subtitle, and proper nouns. This page contains some other useful sources and good examples you might want to check out if you get stuck as you’re creating your citations. Don’t hesitate to contact the Library with any questions about citation.

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